Call for Papers | VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture | Echoes and Frequencies. Tele-Visions and Wireless Technologies. 19th-21st Centuries.

As part of its Tele->Visions research program, IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles members Léa Dreyer, Evgenii Kozlov, Pierre-Jacques Pernuit, Clara Royer will co-edit with Anne-Katrin Weber (Université de Lausanne) an issue of VIEW: The Journal of European Television History & Culture. Below is the call, which can also be found here.

In 1924, the “Jenkins Picture-Strip Machine,” a wireless-photography transmission device invented by the U.S. television pioneer Charles Jenkins, was used as part of an ambitious astronomy experiment. On August 21, the closest the planet Mars had been to Earth in eight years, all U.S. radio stations were asked to pause their broadcasts for five minutes in anticipation of the pick-up of possible Martian signals. The Jenkins Machine recorded onto film on this occasion a series of dots and dashes: traces of radio waves that weren’t sent by any Martian creature but were in fact a manifestation of the natural phenomenon known as “cosmic noise.” At the peak of the interwar “communications euphoria,” such “radio vision” fostered “an aesthetic of the [electromagnetic] signal” (Gethmann, 2013, p.75). This example is a telling case of the cultural reception of the profound epistemic shift marked by the discovery of Hertzian waves and their rapid deployment in telecommunications, a process that began in the late nineteenth century with the development of wireless telegraphy and radio. Beyond the mere absence of cable, this shift brought about a new media paradigm with social, political, artistic, and philosophical resonances which have frequently been reassessed as new wireless technologies have emerged. For instance, the “wireless being” described by computer scientist Nicholas Negroponte in 2002 in response to the expansion of Wi-Fi (Negroponte, 2002) echoed and updated the “new and astonishing world” of wireless technologies described by William Crookes as early as 1892 (Crookes, 1892 p. 174).

Expanding the scope of the international conference Tele-Visions: Technologies of Ubiquity in Visuals Arts held in Paris on October 3 and 4, 2023, this issue of VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture invites inquiries into the discourses and practices of tele-visions reflecting a shift toward a wireless epistémè. Beyond the medium of television itself, the plural “tele-visions” refers to the variety of remote viewing technologies and image transmission techniques, from radar to satellite and up to Wi-Fi, which have configured new models for the circulation and transmission of visual contents. At the crossroads of art history, media studies and STS—including, but not limited to, visual studies, broadcasting studies, radio studies and sound studies—as well as in echoes of recent inquiries into the circulation and transportation of images (Jenkins, Ford and Green 2018, Mostakova, 2021, Feitved, 2013) contributors to this issue are invited to explore the electromagnetic dimension of tele-vision technologies1. Throughout the last 10 years, this discipline-cum-methodology branched out into various disciplines, fostering a hybridization that challenges the common conceptions held in the fields of humanity and histories of technology (Galili & Huhtamo 2020). Echoes of this new academic pursuit have been felt in the realm of television studies and have prompted detailed rereading of the history of the medium as well as excavation of its unexpected aspects (Galili, 2020, Weber 2022), as evidenced by the 2015 issue of View “TV Archeologies” edited by Andreas Fickers and Anne-Katrin Weber (Fickers and Weber, 2015). Following up on these recent research endeavors, we encourage contributions from authors with different expertise and interests in “tele-vision,” alongside (but not limited to) the following themes:


1 — SPECTRAL IMAGINARIES

We invite scholars to draw on the “imaginary media” (Kluitenberg, 2006) that have anticipated and shaped the very idea of wireless tele-vision. Well into the interwar period, multiple models for understanding electromagnetism coexisted in popular conceptions. Reflections on the ether that have accompanied the birth of abstraction throughout what scholars have called “vibratory modernism” (Henderson, 2002; Enns, Trower, 2013), have influenced the work of the historical avant-gardes as early as Kupka’s turn-of-the-century dreams of a “telepathic” painting. Further on, planetary and cosmic aspirations have found expression through cultural conceptions such as Gene Youngblood’s videosphere (Youngblood, 1970), that in part designates the electromagnetic paradigm of tele-vision.

This issue also welcomes papers discussing the cultural intersections of parasciences and the electromagnetic spectrum as well as the cultural histories of “electronic presence” and “technical delusion” (Sconce, 2000; 2019). We believe that the fantasies of a shared electromagnetic space that inhabit the imaginaries of the radiophonic, televisual and computer wireless networks and communities can help to outline an electromagnetic archeology of tele-vision.

Sound studies have already invited media studies to reconsider the electromagnetic spectrum in its sensorial, aesthetic and social implications. Inclusive and transversal understandings of electromagnetic energy fields, ranging from visible light to radiowaves, have given rise to transductive regimes that have sparked what scholars have called “signal plenitude” and “panaurality” (Kahn, 1999; Kahn, 2014). We therefore welcome papers exploring the productive intersection of sound studies and visual culture, renewing approaches to tele-visions through accounts of energies of “abiotic” origin.

2 — SEEING BY FREQUENCIES: FROM THE INTERFACES TO THE INFRASTRUCTURES OF THE WIRELESS

The wireless or Hertzian turn has marked an important shift in the long history of remote vision techniques. If the optical vision has always been connected to the human eye, increasing its reach by ever-evolving prosthetic devices, the wireless is part of a modern reconfiguration of the vision now organized both as transmission and visualization: it brings closer what is far away through the transportation of images and signs, and embraces into the field of vision what was excluded from it.

This expanded field of visibility opens up to physical realities that are accessible to the human eye only to the extent that an interface allows it: from the visualization of X-rays, generating its own visual culture (Natale, 2011), to the dynamic screens of radars as ingenious forms of real-time imaging (Geoghegan, 2019), the electromagnetic spectrum continuously produces traces intercepted, stored and translated into a variety of inscriptive and tele-visual media. These artifacts possess not only technical and scientific significance but also carry cultural and artistic implications. Indeed, the electromagnetic spectrum itself could be transformed into a source from which new artistic forms may be derived or even intercepted, as exemplified by the works of Swedish artist Lars Fredrikson (1926–1997) and within the broader context of telematic art. We welcome papers exploring this direction not only within visual arts and cultures but also extending far beyond, encompassing the vast realm of remote-seeing practices envisioned here as material practices.

Though frequently associated with the immaterial and the invisible, putting forward the very absence of cables, the wireless relies on an extensive communication infrastructure (Starosielski, 2015), often relegated into the background, either through the proliferation of interfaces, or through strategies of concealment or even camouflage (Parks, 2009). However, as evidenced by the recent scholarly interest in the logistical and infrastructural media, rendering devices (interfaces) are not conceivable without capturing devices (antennas and sensors broadly defined), as well as infrastructures connecting the former and the latter together. We encourage submissions that explore and shed light on this infrastructural dimension of remote viewing practices.


3 — NAVIGATING ELECTROMAGNETIC TERRITORIES

This third track invites scholars to delve into the intricate interplay between the territorial nature of electromagnetic waves and the geopolitical forces that inform their trajectories. As they cross territories, waves bring with them a tapestry of geographic, political, and environmental issues. Each country establishes its own set of rules and standards governing their use, resulting in a patchwork of broadcasting standards across different geographic territories. As a result, the electromagnetic spectrum reflects a complex web of international relations, trade agreements, national policies, and techno-diplomatic negotiations (Balbi and Fickers, 2020).

We encourage papers that scrutinize the intricate dynamics of “electromagnetic politics,” ranging from the regulatory allocation of frequency spectra to the subversive realms of hackingresistancediversion, and pirate radio, including deliberate disruptions or control of signals. This may include reflections on cultural diplomacy during the Cold War, postcolonial approaches in the context of the Non-Aligned Movement, as well as insights into the global governance of space-related technologies, including satellites and their footprints (Parks, 2005; Slotten, 2022).

As the environmental turn of media studies reminds us (Horn, 2018; Peters, 2015), elements are the primary carriers of media and it is crucial to recognize nature as the backdrop of wireless technologies. The topography of the Earth is a critical factor influencing the transmission of electromagnetic signals. Mountains, bodies of water, and atmospheric conditions present challenges that necessitate technological adaptations. We invite inquiries into waves as natural resources, prompting an examination of anthropic influence on the geopolitical dynamics of mediated spaces.

1  On the topic of the circulation of images, see the recent Symposium “Transporting Images,” an “Economies of Aesthetics” Symposium held at Brown University on October 20, 2024 and convened by Peter Szendy.


***


Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on June 15, 2024. Submissions should be sent to journal@euscreen.eu. A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors early July 2024.

Articles (between 3,000 – 6,000 words) will be due on December 31, 2024. Longer articles are welcome, provided that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines (https://www.viewjournal.eu/about/submissions/).

All articles will be peer-reviewed.

For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors at imago.tele.visions@gmail.com.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Gabriele Balbi and Simone Natale, “The Double Birth of Wireless: Italian Radio Amateurs and the Interpretative Flexibility of New Media,” Journal of Radio & Audio Media, 22-1, 2015, pp. 26‑41.

Gabriele Balbi and Andreas Fickers, History of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU): Transnational techno-diplomacy from the telegraph to the Internet, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2020.

William Crookes, “Some Possibilities of Electricity,” Fortnightly Review, February 1, 1892, pp. 174-176.

Judd A. Case, “Logistical Media: Fragments from Radar’s Prehistory,” Canadian Journal of Communication, 38-3, 2013, pp. 379‑396.

Sophie Duplaix, “Om, Ohm ; ou les avatars de la Musique des sphères. Du rêve à la rêverie, de l’extase à la dépression,” in Sophie Duplaix and Marcella Lista (eds.), Sons & Lumières : une histoire du son dans l’art du XXème siècle, Paris: Centre Georges Pompidou, 2004, pp. 91-101.

Anthony Enns and Shelley Trower (eds.), Vibratory Modernism, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire (UK) and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

Wolfgang Ernst, Sonic Time Machines: Explicit Sound, Sirenic Voices, and Implicit Sonicity, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016.

Arlid Fetveit, “The Ubiquity of Photography,” Throughout: Art and Culture Emerging with Ubiquitous Computing, edited by Ulrik Ekman, 89–102. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2013.

Andreas Fickers, “Visibly Audible: The Radio Dial as Mediating Interface,” in Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. 411–39.

Andreas Fickers et Anne-Katrin Weber, « Editorial: Towards an Archaeology of Television », 4-7, 2015 <https://viewjournal.eu/articles/10.18146/2213-0969.2015.jethc076>.

Doron Galili, Seeing by electricity: cinema, moving image transmission, and the emergence of television, 1878-1939, Durham, Duke University Press, 2020.

Bernard Dionysius Geoghegan, “An Ecology of Operations: Vigilance, Radar, and the Birth of the Computer Screen,” Representations, 147-1, 2019, pp. 59‑95.

Daniel Gethmann, “The Aesthetics of the Signal: Noise Research in Long-Wave Radio Communications,” Osiris, 28-1, 2013, pp. 64‑79.

Linda Dalrymple Henderson, “Vibratory Modernism: Boccioni, Kupka, and the Ether of Space,” in Linda Dalrymple Henderson and Bruce Clarke, From Energy to Information. Representation in Science and Technology, Art, and Literature, Stanford (California): Stanford University Press, 2002, pp. 126‑49.

Erkki Huhtamo et Doron Galili, “The pasts and prospects of media archaeology”, Early Popular Visual Culture, 18-4, 2020, pp. 333‑339.

Eva Horn, “Air as Medium,” Grey Room, 73, 2018, pp. 6‑25.

David Kaiser, How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.

Douglas Kahn, Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts, Cambridge (Mass.): The MIT Press, 1999.

— Earth Sound Earth Signal, Energies and Earth Magnitude in the Arts, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013.

— (ed.), Energies in the Arts, Cambridge (Mass.): The MIT Press, 2019.

Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green, Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in Networked Culture, New York, New York University Press, 2018;

Eric Kluitenberg (ed.), The Book of Imaginary Media: Excavating the Dream of the Ultimate Communication Medium, Rotterdam: De Balie, NAi Publishers, 2006.

Adrian Mackenzie, Wirelessness: Radical Empiricism in Network Cultures, Cambridge (Mass.), The MIT Press, 2010.

Olga Moskatova (dir.), Images on the Move: materiality—networks—formats, Bielefeld, transcript, 2021.

Simone Natale, “The invisible made visible: X-Rays as Attraction and Visual Medium at the End of the Nineteenth Century,” Media History, 17-4, 2011, pp. 345‑58.

Nicholas Negroponte, “Being Wireless,” Wired, 10-10, 2002. Online: <https://www.wired.com/2002/10/wireless/> [consulted on 23/02/24].

Georges Roque, “Ce grand monde des vibrations qui est à la base de l’univers,” in Serge Lemoine and Pascal Rousseau (eds.), Aux origines de l’abstraction: 1800-1914, Paris: Réunion des musées nationaux, 2003, pp. 50-67.

Ned Rossiter, “Logistical Media Theory, the Politics of Time, and the Geopolitics of Automation,” in Matthew Hockenberry, Nicole Starosielski, and Susan Zieger (eds.), Assembly Codes: The Logistics of Media, Durham: Duke University Press, 2021, pp. 132–50.

Jenna Supp-Montgomerie, When the Medium Was the Mission: The Atlantic Telegraph and the Religious Origins of Network Culture, New York: NYU Press, 2021.

Lisa Parks, Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual, Durham: Duke University Press, 2005.

— “Around the Antenna Tree: The Politics of Infrastructural Visibility, Flow,” February 2024. Online : < https://www.flowjournal.org/2009/03/around-the-antenna-tree-the-politics-of-infrastructural-visibilitylisa-parks-uc-santa-barbara/ > [consulted on 26/02/2024].

John Durham Peters, Florian Sprenger, and Christina Vagt (eds.), Action at a Distance, Lüneburg; Meson Press, 2020.

John Durham Peters, Speaking Into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

— The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015.

Marc Raboy, Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Jeffrey Sconce, Haunted Media: Electronic Presence from Telegraphy to Television, Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.

— The Technical Delusion: Electronics, Power, Insanity, Durham: Duke University Press, 2019.

Hugh R. Slotten, Beyond Sputnik and the Space Race: The Origins of Global Satellite Communications, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2022.

Nicole Starosielski, Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures, Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2015.

— The Undersea Network, Durham: Duke University Press, 2015.

— “The Elements of Media Studies,” Media+Environment, 1-1, 2019.

Ghislain Thibault, “Bolts and Waves: Representing Radio Signals,” Early Popular Visual Culture, 16-1, 2018, pp. 39‑56.

Gene Youngblood, Expanded Cinema, New York: Dutton, 1970.

Anne-Katrin Weber, Television before TV: New Media and Exhibition Culture in Europe and the USA, 1928-1939., S.l., Am Univ Press, 2022.

Woodruff Turner Sullivan, Cosmic noise: a History of Early Radio Astronomy, Cambridge (UK ) and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

TÉLÉ—>VISIONS : SÉMINAIRE IMAGO-CULTURES VISUELLES 2024

[ENGLISH BELOW]

Dans la continuité du thème des Télé-Visions et de l’étude de l’impact des technologies d’ubiquité dans les arts visuels, nous organisons six séances de séminaire à partir de janvier 2024 avec des invités internationaux, comprenant à la fois des chercheurs et des artistes.

Cette année, notre séminaire adoptera un format hybride, combinant des sessions en ligne et sur place à l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA), à Paris. Les liens Zoom seront fournis début janvier pour faciliter l’accès.

Notre premier rendez-vous aura lieu le 25 janvier 2024. Il s’agira d’une session en ligne avec John Durno (Université de Victoria), Mikhel Proulx (Université Queen’s) et Hank Bull (Western Front), qui exploreront l’impact des technologies de l’information et de la communication dans le Canada des années 1970-1980 et se pencheront sur l’art du Télidon, le technonationalisme et bien plus encore.

______________________________

January 25, 6 pm to 8 pm (CET), Zoom, (no registration needed)

  • John Durno (University of Victoria), Shapes Blown Apart: Telidon Art and the Struggle to Appropriate Canadian Videotex
  • Mikhel Proulx (Queen’s University), Technonationalism and Telematic Art in Canada: Vera Frenkel’s String Games (1974)
  • Hank Bull (Western Front), Conversation With…

February 9, 6 pm to 7:30 pm (CET), Online

  • Sylvie Pierre (Université de Lorraine), Jean Christophe Averty : engagement et expérimentation à la télévision française

February 29, 6 pm to 8 pm (CET), Online

  • Philip Glahn (Temple University) and Cary Levine (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), (In)Dividual Technologies: Televisual Embodiment in the Work of Mobile Image

March 18 , 6 pm to 7:30 pm, salle Vasari (Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art)

  • Noé Magetti (Université de Lausanne), La télé-vision comme machine narrative autour de 1900

April 19, 6 pm to 8 pm, salle Walter Benjamin (Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art) et via Zoom (no registration needed)

  • Marie Vicet (Université Paris Nanterre), Interventions d’artistes sur le Minitel en France (1983-1989)

May 2, 6 pm to 7:30 pm (CET), Online only, Via Zoom (no registration needed)

  • Lori Emerson (University of Colorado Boulder), The Material Lives of Phantasmic Networks

______________________________

Expanding on the theme of Tele-Visions and the impact of technologies of ubiquity in the visual arts, we have curated six sessions featuring international guests, with both researchers and artists. We eagerly anticipate delving into their latest work on this fascinating topic.

This year, our seminar will adopt a hybrid format, combing online and onsite sessions at the Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA). Zoom links will be provided in early January for easy access. Stay tune for updates.

For now, please mark your calendars for January 25! We’re hosting an online session with John Durno (University of Victoria), Mikhel Proulx (Queen’s University), and Hank Bull (Western Front). Join us as we explore the impact of information and communication technologies in 1970s-1980s Canada, delving into Telidon art, technonationalism, and much more.

TELE-VISIONS PARIS-INHA-OCTOBER 3/4

IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles tient à remercier tous les participants et le public nombreux du colloque international Tele-vision : Technologies de l’ubiquité dans les arts visuels (XIXe-XXIe siècle) qui s’est tenu les 3 et 4 octobre à l’INHA à Paris. Merci d’avoir fait de cet évènement un espace de dialogues et d’échanges passionnants !

IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles would like to thank all the participants and the vast audience who attended the international conference “Tele-vision: Technologies of Ubiquity in the Visual Arts (19th-21st Centuries)” held on October 3rd and 4th at INHA in Paris. Thank you for the exciting dialogues and exchanges!

Conference : Tele → Visions: Technologies of Ubiquity in the Visual Arts, 19th-21st centuries (Paris, 3–4 Oct 23)

[VF en contrebas]

This event is convened by the research group IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles (Dr. Pascal Rousseau, Professor of Contemporary Art History, Dr. Pierre-Jacques Pernuit, and Ph.D. candidates Léa Dreyer, Evgenii Kozlof and Clara M. Royer) from the Centre de recherche Histoire Culturelle et Sociale de l’Art (HiCSA), with its generous support as well as that of the École Doctorale 441 d’Histoire de l’art, the Collège des écoles doctorales de l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and the Laboratoire International de Recherches en Art (LIRA EA7343, Université Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle).

The international symposium Télé—Visions brings together a body of recent work on the influence of emission, transmission and reception technologies in the visual arts and visual culture, from the 19th century to the present. Beyond the medium of television itself, the plural “tele-visions” refers to the variety of remote viewing and image transmission techniques which, from semaphores to wireless telegraphy and up to fiber optics and contemporary networks, have configured new models for the circulation and transmission of images. Dialoguing with the history of science and technology as well as with media archaeology, the contributors to the conference will explore broad topics such as the joint evolution of perceptual regimes and remote transmission techniques, the modalities of “prosthetic vision,” the material effects of image transmission and the spatio-temporal issues inherent to network dynamics.


This conference takes as its core hypothesis that the “conquest of ubiquity” by the transport of images at any time and in any place described by Paul Valéry in 1928 anticipated the contemporary society of globalized exchanges and, as such, marks a turning point in the history of art. The association IMAGO—Cultures Visuelles proposes to study this turning point, placing it within the historical panorama of the great artistic changes brought about by technology, in the spirit of the importance respectively given to reproduction and storage technologies by Walter Benjamin and Friedrich A. Kittler. Recent research in media studies shows a growing interest in visual telecommunication technologies through such key concepts of “circulation,” “flow” and “network.” Télé—Visions proposes to broaden the scope of this new conceptual understanding of images by exploring the social factors, cultural strategies and technical-aesthetic concerns that have shaped the history of transmitted images and the artistic use of telecommunications.

This event is free and open to the public without reservation. The conference will be live-streamed via Zoom. It will be held in French and English.

For those of you who will not be able to join us on-site, please do not hesitate to connect on Zoom by following these links:

DAY 1 – https://pantheonsorbonne.zoom.us/j/97611932825…

DAY 2 – https://pantheonsorbonne.zoom.us/j/97002188404…

Venue : Auditorium Jacqueline Lichtenstein, Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA), 2 rue Vivienne 75002 Paris, France.

You can access the complete conference program through the following link :

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1b-QjfrGIBx7Jt1Ldvpn27-RTUxJpymSg/view?fbclid=IwAR3IQ4WTyXzIElPxPdZmF71V5Pv6nIt4EndIIO92wQtaOFNvAOch9Q-walg

PROGRAM

TUESDAY, October, 3

2 p.m. Introduction

2:15 pm Pascal Rousseau (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Psychométrie. Le tact de la vision à distance

2:45 pm André Lange (histv.net), L’invention littéraire de la vision à distance

3:15 pm Coffee break

3:30 pm Evgenii Kozlov (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Carrying the Sign into the Distance: Aerial Telegraphy, or Writing/Reading Images in the Landscape

4:00 pm Doron Galili (University of Gothenburg/Stockholm University), Recording and Transmitting Electrical Images in the Fin-de-siecle

4:30 pm Coffee break

4:45 pm Antonio Somaini (Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle), Transparency, Dissolution, Wireless Transmission: László Moholy-Nagy’s Dematerialization of Technical Media

5:15 pm Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Distant Lights: Avant-garde TV Experiments in the Interwar 

WEDNESDAY, October, 4

9:30 am Gillian Young (Wofford College), Archaeologies of Telepresence in the Early Work of Joan Jonas

10:00 am Léa Dreyer (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), “Some Circumstances that Separate Us”: Implicit Sonicity in Lars Fredrikson’s Fax Art

10:30 am Beatriz Escribano Belmar (Universidad de Salamanca), Reproduction, Transmission, and Distance: Revealing the Aesthetics of Poor Images in Artistic Fax Exchanges

11:00 am Coffee break

11:15 am Francesco Spampinato (Università di Bologna), Access to Tools: Guerrilla Television, Media Art and the late 1960s Counterculture

11:45 am Jean-Paul Fourmentraux (Aix-Marseille Université), Sousveillance: L’œil du contre-pouvoir

12:15 am Lunch break

2:00 pm Anne-Katrin Weber (Universität Basel), Televisual Mission Control, ca.1969

2:30 pm Brooke Belisle (Stony Brook University), Mediating the Moon: Imaging as Observation and Simulation

3:00 pm Coffee break

3:15 pm Clara M. Royer (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Communicationsphere: Sarah Dickinson and Aldo Tambellini’s geopolitics of telepresence

3:45 pm Kris Paulsen (Ohio State University), Martian Time Slips: Telepresent Views of a Future Mars

4:15 pm Discussion and closing remarks.

—-—-—-

Le colloque international Télé — Visions fédère un ensemble de récents travaux portant sur le rayonnement des technologies d’émission, de transmission et de réception dans les arts plastiques et la culture visuelle, du XIXe  siècle à nos jours. Au-delà du médium de la télévision en lui-même, le pluriel « Télé — Visions » fait référence à la pluralité des techniques de vision à distance et de transmission d’images qui, des sémaphores à la télégraphie sans fil, en passant par la fibre optique et jusqu’au réseau informatique contemporain, ont configuré de nouveaux modèles de circulation et de transmission des images selon des principes de flux et d’immédiateté. Au prisme d’un dialogue avec l’histoire des sciences et des techniques et l’archéologie des médias, les intervenant·e·s interrogeront l’évolution conjointe des régimes de perceptions et des techniques de transmission à distance, les modalités de la « vision prosthétique », les effets matériels de la transmission des images et les problématiques spatio-temporelles inhérentes aux dynamiques des réseaux.

L’hypothèse qui motive ce projet est que la «conquête de l’ubiquité» par le «transport» des images «à tout moment» et «en tout lieu» décrit par Paul Valéry en 1928, a anticipé la société d’échanges mondialisés que nous connaissons aujourd’hui et marque, à ce titre, un tournant dans l’histoire de l’art et des images. L’association IMAGO propose d’étudier ce virage en l’inscrivant dans le panorama historique des grands bouleversements artistiques entraînés par le perfectionnement de la technologie, au même titre que la reproductibilité technique et les technologies de stockage respectivement étudiées par Walter Benjamin et Friedrich A. Kittler. La recherche récente en étude de médias donne à voir un intérêt croissant pour les technologies de télécommunications visuelles à travers les concepts clefs de « circulation », de «flux » et de « réseau », trois notions qui participent d’un renouvellement théorique des conceptions de l’image. Télé — Visions donne suite à ces travaux et propose d’en élargir la portée par l’exploration des facteurs sociaux, des stratégies culturelles et des préoccupations technico-esthétiques ayant façonné l’histoire des images transmises et de l’utilisation artistique des télécommunications.

S2 TÉLÉ—>VISION

Deuxième Séance, le mardi 2 mai 2023, INHA, salle Jullian (Galerie Colbert – 2, rue Vivienne – Paris 2ème – 1er étage), de 18h-20h.

Une captation vidéo de cette conférence est accessible à travers le lien suivant : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c79Zn1k9DyM

L’association IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles a le plaisir de vous inviter à la deuxième séance de son séminaire de recherche Télé-Visions : Technologies de l’ubiquité dans les arts visuels (XIXe — XXIe siècles). Sondant le rayonnement des technologies d’émission, de transmission et de réception dans les arts plastiques et la culture visuelle, ce séminaire propose de fédérer un ensemble de recherches récentes portant sur les rapports entre art et technologies de vision à distance, du XIXe siècle à nos jours.

  • Dr. André Lange, collaborateur du Département médias, Culture et Communications de l’Université de Liège et directeur scientifique du site Histoire de la télévision (et de quelques autres médias) [https://hsitv.net] présentera en français une conférence titrée : « Coder la mosaïque : les premières expériences de transmission d’images numérisées à la fin du 19ème siècle »

« L’archéologie des médias, pour être crédible, ne peut se contenter de théorisations provocatrices. Elle doit assumer sa métaphore et se livrer à une exploration systématique, précise, des traces restées enfouies dans des gisements inexplorés. L’accessibilité accrue de ces traces, permise par la numérisation des bibliothèques et hémérothèques, permet de revisiter l’historiographie classique des origines de la télévision.  Lorsque la réflexion sur la transmission des images à distance se développe à la fin du XIXème siècle, deux modèles d’analyse de l’image dominent : le modèle de l’analyse en mosaïque (Carey, Liesegang, Szczepanik…) et celui de l’analyse linéaire (disque de Nipkow, tambour de miroirs d’Atkinson et Weiller…). Le modèle d’analyse linéaire l’emporte au XXème siècle avec le bélinographe, la télévision mécanique puis la télévision électronique. Il est grand temps, à l’ère de la télévision numérique, de redécouvrir que la théorisation et l’expérimentation de la transmission d’images codées était déjà à l’ordre du jour à la fin du XIXème siècle dans un modèle labellisé par Arthur Korn en tant que “méthode statistique”.»

————————————- ENGLISH—————————————

May, 2 2023, INHA, salle Jullian, 6-8 pm (UTC+1) Galerie Colbert – 2, rue Vivienne – Paris 2ème – 1er étage. This conference has been recorded and can bee watched online : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c79Zn1k9DyM

IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles is happy to invite you to the second session of its research seminar Tele-Visions: Technologies of Ubiquity in the Visual Arts (19th—21st c.). Investigating the influence of technologies of emission, transmission and reception in the visual arts and culture, this seminar proposes to federate a set of recent research on the relationship between art and technologies of remote viewing, from the 19th century to the present.

  • Dr. André Lange, collaborator of the Department of Media, Culture and Communications at the University of Liège and scientific director of the website “Histoire de la télévision (et de quelques autres médias)”[https://hsitv.net], will present in French on the following topic : “Coding the mosaic: the first experiments in the transmission of digitized images at the end of the 19th century”

“Media archeology, to be credible, should go beyond provocative theorizations. It must assume its metaphor and engage in a systematic, precise exploration of the traces that remain buried and left unexplored. The increased accessibility of these traces, allowed by the digitization of libraries and hémérothèques allows to revisit the classic historiography of the origins of the television. When the reflection on the possibility to transmit images at a distance developed at the end of the 19th century, two models of image analysis dominated: the model of mosaic analysis (Carey, Liesegang, Szczepanik…) and that of linear analysis (Nipkow’s disk, Atkinson and Weiller’s drum of mirrors,…).The model of linear analysis prevails in the XXth century with the belinograph, the mechanical television and electronic television. It is now time, in the era of digital television, to rediscover how the theorization and experimentation on the transmission of coded images was already being developed at the end of the nineteenth century, with a model that Arthur Korn dubbed the “statistical method”.”

PROGRAMME EN COURS TÉLÉ—>VISIONS

Séminaire de Recherche IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles 20232025

Le télégraphe optique du Louvre à Paris avec l’alphabet des signes, gravure, vers 1795, Museumsstiftung Post und Telekommunikation, Frankfurt.

De 2023 à 2025, le séminaire de recherche IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles portera sur l’influence des technologies d’émission, de transmission et de réception dans les arts et cultures visuelles, du XIXe siècle à nos jours. À l’intersection de l’histoire de l’art et des études visuelles, de l’histoire des sciences et des techniques, de l’archéologie et de la théorie des médias, le séminaire Télé-Visions : Technologies de l’ubiquité dans les arts visuels (XIXe — XXIe siècles) propose de fédérer un ensemble de recherches récentes portant sur les liens entre images, arts visuels et technologies de vision à distance.

Au-delà du médium du même nom, le pluriel « télé–visions » fait référence à la pluralité des techniques de vision à distance et de transmission d’images qui, des sémaphores à la télégraphie sans fil, en passant par la fibre optique et jusqu’au réseau informatique contemporain, ont configuré la longue histoire des rapports entre art et technologie. En organisant un dialogue autour de ces objets, l’association IMAGO entend faciliter une réflexion sur un ensemble de pratiques artistiques aux prises avec les technologies « télé-visuelles » de leur temps. Nos intervenant·e·s interrogeront l’évolution conjointe des régimes de perceptions et des techniques de transmission et de vision à distance, les modalités de la « vision prosthétique », les effets matériels de la transmission des images et les problématiques spatio-temporelles inhérentes aux dynamiques des réseaux. Ces rendez-vous seront également l’occasion de s’intéresser aux conditions de la télécommunication comme forme de création résolument collaborative et décentralisée. Il s’agira, enfin, de fournir les bases historiques nécessaires à une compréhension plus complète des pratiques éminemment actuelles du net.art.

Équipe organisatrice : Léa Dreyer, Evgenii Kozlov, Pierre J Pernuit, Clara Royer.

————————————- ENGLISH—————————————

From 2023 to 2025, IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles’ research group seminar will address the influence of technologies of emission, transmission, and reception in the visual arts and cultures, from the 19th century to the present day. At the intersection of art history and visual studies, the history of science and technology, media archaeology and media theory, the seminar Tele-Visions: Technologies of Ubiquity in the Visual arts (19th—21st century) aims at providing a forum for scholars dedicating their research to the long history of the relationship between images, visual arts, and remote viewing technologies.

Beyond the medium of television itself, IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles invites academics to investigate and reflect on the plurality of techniques of remote vision and image transmission which, from semaphores and wireless telegraphy, through optical fibers and up to contemporary computer network, have shaped the long history of the relationship between art and technology. By organizing a dialogue around these objects, the IMAGO association intends to facilitate a reflection on a set of artistic practices that are at grips with the “tele-visual” technologies of their time. Our speakers will question the joint evolution of the regimes of perception and the techniques of transmission and remote viewing, the modalities of the “prosthetic vision”, the material effects of the transmission of images and the spatiotemporal problems inherent to the dynamics of networks. These meetings will also be an opportunity to focus on the conditions of telecommunication as a form of creation that is resolutely collaborative and decentralized. Finally, it will provide the necessary historical basis for a more complete understanding of the current practices of net.art.

Contact : imago.tele.visions@gmail.com

S1 Télé—>Vision

Première Séance, le 9 février 2023, INHA, salle Jullian, 18h-20h et par Zoom https://pantheonsorbonne.zoom.us/j/95190104119?pwd=NHNubXpDNWpjbnZncllRMDR2aWxYQT09 (ID de réunion : 951 9010 4119/ Code secret : 0000)

L’association IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles a le plaisir de vous inviter à la première séance de son séminaire de recherche Télé-Visions : Technologies de l’ubiquité dans les arts visuels (XIXe — XXIe siècles). Sondant le rayonnement des technologies d’émission, de transmission et de réception dans les arts plastiques et la culture visuelle, ce séminaire propose de fédérer un ensemble de recherches récentes portant sur les rapports entre art et technologies de vision à distance, du XIXe siècle à nos jours.

La première séance se déroulera le 9 février 2023 en salle Jullian à l’Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art (Galerie Colbert — 2 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris — 1er étage) :

  • Dr. Jonathan Dentler, postdoctorant au Early Conflict Photography and Visual AI (EyCon) Project du Laboratoire d’Excellence « Les Passés dans le Présent » de l’Université Paris Nanterre, présentera en anglais une conférence titrée : « Shipwreck with Spectator and Radio Antenna: The Vestris Photographs and the Interwar Culture of Distance ».

Jonathan Dentler a reçu son doctorat et son graduate certificate en études visuelles à l’University of Southern California. Sa thèse, titrée « Wired Images: Visual Telecommunications, News Agencies, and the Invention of the World Picture, 1917–1955 », est une histoire des services de photographie câblée. Elle révèle comment « l’image câblée » — autant les photographies elles-mêmes que les institutions et les pratiques permettant leur circulation — a participé de l’émergence d’un public de masse et d’une réflexion sur la manière dont les infrastructures techniques ont construit un nouvel espace global au XXe siècle.

————————————- ENGLISH—————————————

IMAGO-Cultures Visuelles is happy to invite you to the first session of its research seminar Tele-Visions: Technologies of Ubiquity in the Visual Arts (19th—21st c.). the art and archeology of techniques of vision at a distance. Investigating the influence of technologies of emission, transmission and reception in the visual arts and culture, this seminar proposes to federate a set of recent research on the relationship between art and technologies of remote viewing, from the 19th century to the present.

The first session will take place on February 9, 2023, salle Jullian, at the Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art (Galerie Colbert — 2 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris):

  • Dr. Jonathan Dentler, postdoctoral fellow at the Early Conflict Photography and Visual AI (EyCon) Project du Laboratoire d’Excellence “Les Passés dans le Présent” of Université Paris Nanterre, will present on the following topic: “Shipwreck with Spectator and Radio Antenna: The Vestris Photographs and the Interwar Culture of Distance.”

Jonathan Dentler received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Southern California, where he also earned a graduate certificate in Visual Studies. His dissertation, entitled “Wired Images: Visual Telecommunications, News Agencies, and the Invention of the World Picture, 1917–1955,” is a history of wire photography services. It shows how the “wired image”—not only wire photos’ material instantiations, but also the institutions and practices that permitted their circulation—produced a mass public that used these pictures to reflect on the way infrastructure was reshaping global space in the 20th century.

Journée d’étude “Médium plastique, milieu scénique : transferts des théories et pratiques entre les arts visuels et spectaculaires (1860-1940)”

Lundi 26 septembre 2022 à la Galerie Colbert
2, rue Vivienne – Paris 2e
Salle Vasari (1er étage)

Ainsi que sur Zoom :

https://smithsonian.zoom.us/j/81026279963?pwd=Mm1HMUpMQ0JmS0lCL1V1SS9NbWx3dz09

Code d’accès : 0000

Dans la lignée du rêve wagnérien de la Gesamtkunstwerk, la scène fut à l’époque moderne l’espace par excellence du dialogue entre les arts plastiques et vivants. Par l’analyse des travaux et théories des figures clés de la modernité théâtrale, des réalisations de Kandinsky, Schönberg ou encore, en aval chronologique, celles menées au Bauhaus, les histoires du théâtre et de l’art ont montré combien la modernité scénique inaugure une tradition de l’intermédialité. Dans un tout autre domaine, les récents travaux dans le champ des études de médias ont évoqué, à rebours de l’appréhension technique et matérialiste du terme, l’étymologie environnementale du concept de « médium ». Ainsi et par l’entremise de la notion grecque de « metaxu » et de son pendant latin le « media diaphana », les études de médias nous rappellent que le terme de médium désigne d’abord le milieu de la perception du réel, un espace ou une atmosphère. Cette journée d’étude interrogera la valeur historique et heuristique du concept de médium comme milieu, comme environnement perceptif. Nous prendrons pour hypothèse l’idée que le médium-milieu pourrait être l’un des cadres théoriques et historiques pour prolonger l’analyse des transferts esthétiques et pratiques entre les univers de la toile et de la scène. Outre le médium-milieu comme l’espace du dialogue entre les différents arts, nous invitons les intervenants à déceler les résonances de la conception environnementale du médium en envisageant l’idée d’un partage de l’expérience esthétique qui fut notamment justifiée par les artisans des transferts de la peinture au théâtre, à la faveur d’hypothèses tantôt spiritualistes et tantôt empathiques. Dans le vis-à-vis entre la peinture et l’art des décors théâtraux peints, on s’intéressera aussi aux discours théoriques sur le rôle de la lumière électrique, sur sa dimension proprement environnementale, et enfin aux conceptions de l’espace scénique comme cadre de la motricité du corps des acteurs et actrices. 

Rudolf von Laban, Die Welt dez Tänzers, Stuttgart, 1920.

Programme

14h00 — Introduction : David Picquart & Pierre-Jacques Pernuit

— Panel 1 —

Discutant : Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

14h20 — Marion Sergent (INHA) — « Chromogénèse et atmosphères voilées : l’art total d’Ernest Klausz ». 

14h40 — David Picquart (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) — « Empathie vibratoire et atmosphère lumineuse : la construction de l’espace abstrait dans les compositions scéniques de Kandinsky ».

15h00 — Bárbara Janicas (ESTCA-Université Paris 8) — « Entr’acte, ou comment le cinéma s’invite sur la scène des Ballets Suédois ».

15h20 — Q&A 

15h50 — Pause-café 

— Panel 2 —

Discutant : Pascal Rousseau (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

16h00 — Marie Gueden (Université Lumière Lyon 2) — « La danse serpentine comme “ventus textilis” (air-tissu) aux croisements entre arts visuels et spectaculaires ». 

16h20 — Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne) — « An all enveloping Medium : images scéniques et pratiques de l’immersion lumineuse en Amérique du nord ».

16h40 — Francesca Ferrari (The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) — « Corporeality and Dispersal in Alexandra Exter’s Designs for the Stage ».

17h10 — Q&A

17h40 — Conclusion : Pascal Rousseau (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

18h00 — Pot de clôture

Médium plastique, milieu scénique : transferts des théories et pratiques entre les arts visuels et spectaculaires (1860-1940)

Adolphe Appia, “Orphée et Eurydice”, 1912, Bibliothèque de Genève, Fonds de l’Institut Jacques-Delcroze.

Dans la lignée du rêve wagnérien de la Gesamtkunstwerk, la scène fut à l’époque moderne l’espace par excellence du dialogue entre les arts plastiques et vivants. Par l’analyse des travaux et théories des figures clés de la modernité théâtrale (A. Appia, E. G. Craig et V. Meyerhold), des réalisations de Kandinsky, Schönberg ou encore, en aval chronologique, celles menées au Bauhaus, les histoires du théâtre et de l’art ont montré combien la modernité scénique inaugure une tradition de l’intermédialité.

Les récents travaux dans le champ des études de médias ont par ailleurs rappelé, à rebours de l’appréhension technique et matérialiste du terme, l’étymologie environnementale du concept de « médium ». Par l’entremise de la notion grecque de « metaxu » et de son pendant latin le « media diaphana », le terme de médium désigne d’abord le milieu de la perception du réel, un espace ou une atmosphère (E. Alloa). Ces études ont aussi montré combien cette acception du terme de médium se prolonge bien au-delà de la pensée antique. On retrouve en effet des traces de ce ferment étymologique dans la pensée de la Naturphilosophie allemande, dans le transcendantalisme américain, mais aussi dans la théorie des médias de Walter Benjamin (A. Somaini). Plus encore, on peut en déceler les échos dans de nombreuses réalisations et théories plastiques et scéniques de la modernité.

En réponse à ce décentrement du sens traditionnellement entendu du terme de médium, cette journée d’étude interrogera la valeur historique et heuristique du concept de médium comme milieu, comme environnement perceptif. Nous prendrons pour hypothèse l’idée que le médium-milieu pourrait être l’un des cadres théoriques et historiques pour prolonger l’analyse des transferts esthétiques et pratiques entre les univers de la toile et de la scène. Outre le médium-milieu comme l’espace du dialogue entre les différents arts, nous invitons les intervenants à déceler les résonances de la conception environnementale du médium en envisageant l’idée d’un partage de l’expérience esthétique qui fut notamment justifiée par les artisans des transferts de la peinture au théâtre, à la faveur d’hypothèses tantôt spiritualistes et tantôt empathiques. Dans le vis-à-vis entre la peinture et l’art des décors théâtraux peints, on s’intéressera aussi aux discours théoriques sur le rôle de la lumière électrique, sur sa dimension proprement environnementale, et enfin aux conceptions de l’espace scénique comme cadre de la motricité du corps des acteurs et actrices. 

À la croisée des modernités plastiques et scéniques, les communications interrogeront la notion de médium environnemental à travers les thèmes de réflexion suivants (non exhaustifs) :

  • Transfert des notions d’abstraction de la toile à la scène.
  • Dialogues entre les théories de l’espace scénique et plastique (notamment chez Adolphe Appia, Émile Jaques-Dalcroze, François Delsarte, El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, Max Reinhardt, Oskar Schlemmer).
  • Transfert des théories de l’espace et de la motricité du corps entre les arts plastiques aux arts scéniques.
  • Les cosmologies physiques de la modernité, notamment le thème « la modernité vibratoire » (Linda Dalrymple Henderson).
  • Les sources aussi diverses que la psychologie, l’anthropologie empathique, l’ésotérisme, la physique transcendantale, la philosophie symboliste.
  • Étude parallèle de la modernité plastique et des théories et pratiques de la décoration picturale et lumineuse.

Bibliographie indicative :

Emmanuel Alloa, « Metaxu. », Revue de métaphysique et de morale, 62, 2009, pp. 247‑262.

Emmanuel Alloa, « L’oubli du médium. Optique et métaphysique de la lumière », in Clelia Nau et Frédéric Cousinié (dir.), La lumière parle. Lumières, reflets, miroirs : du Moyen Âge à l’art vidéo, Paris, 2016, pp. 31‑53.

Fritz Heider, Chose et medium, trad. fr. Emmanuel Alloa, S.l., Vrin, 2017.

Antonio Somaini, « Walter Benjamin’s Media Theory : The Medium and the Apparat », Grey Room, 2016, pp. 6‑41.

Antonio Somaini, « Pour une archéologie du concept de « médium » à l’âge du romantisme. Turner, Hazlitt, Ruskin, Goethe », Romantisme, n° 187-1, 2020, pp. 106‑118.

Modalités de soumission :

Les propositions de communication (le titre de la communication, un résumé de 500 mots (maximum) accompagné d’une courte note biographique (150 mots maximum) sont à envoyer conjointement aux organisateurs à l’adresse : imagocv.contact@gmail.com

Cette journée d’étude se tiendra à l’Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art ( 2, rue Vivienne 75002 Paris) le 26 septembre 2022.

Comité d’organisation :

Pierre J. Pernuit -Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

David Picquart -Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

Journée organisée par l’association de recherche en cultures visuelles IMAGO (XIX-XXe siècles) avec le soutien de l’ED441 et de l’HiCSA (EA 4100) de l’Université Paris Panthéon-Sorbonne.

https://imagocv.hypotheses.org/

techno-images. Configurations visuelles et médias (XIXe-XXIe siècles)

Journée d’études interdisciplinaire dans le cadre du Campus Condorcet, 5 novembre 2019.

Guilherme Machado (université Paris 3 Sorbonne-Nouvelle /Goethe Universität),

Antoine Prévost-Balga (université Paris 3 Sorbonne-Nouvelle /Goethe Universität)

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),

Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

ont le plaisir de vous convier le 5 novembre 2019 de 9H à 18H à la journée d’études interdisciplinaire « Techno-images »

Elle s’interroge sur les images issues des cultures techniques et visuelles de la modernité, dans une perspective de travail héritée de l’archéologie des médias. «Techno-images» explore, au travers de huit communications, les pratiques des images institutionnelles, scientifiques, publicitaires, opérationnelles, psychotechniques dans les cultures visuelles, sur une chronologie allant du XIXe au XXIe siècles.

Si la distinction entre « images traditionnelles » (traditionelle bilder) et « images techniques » (technische bilder) est évoquée par le philosophe des médias Vilém Flusser pour décrire l’image photographique – et plus spécifiquement les images produites par des appareils techniques (apparate) – le projet « Techno-images » propose de réfléchir à la notion à la fois complémentaire et concurrentielle de « techno-image », en la replaçant dans le cadre du tournant « techno-culturel » des médias. Dans la continuité des travaux sur la « culture technique » ou « les techniques de la culture » (Kulturtechniken), apparus à partir des années 1990 dans le contexte de la Medienwissenshaft (Kittler, Siegert), notre recherche s’interroge sur les images produites par les instruments techniques et les diverses pratiques qui contribuent à définir une culture donnée. Ce projet étudie aussi les différentes formes de visualisation ou de configuration visuelle, comprises comme techniques culturelles. À cet égard, nous nous proposons de questionner la notion de « techno-image » de manière interdisciplinaire, afin d’ouvrir aux nouveaux horizons de la recherche, qui interprètent les médias comme des réseaux d’opérations, capables de reproduire, déplacer, traiter et refléter les distinctions fondamentales d’une culture.

Programme

9h15 Introduction


9h30 Ouverture par Pascal Rousseau, professeur d’histoire de l’art contemporain à l’Université Paris 1

10h00

Images techniques et technicité des images chez Vilém Flusser

Francesco Restuccia, la Sapienza-Università di Roma

10h30

Projection : Harun Farocki, Schlagworte – Schlagbilder. Ein Gespräch mit Vilém Flusser, 1986 (7Min.).

11h00

Camera Atomica – Technicité et temporalité des images des explosions atomiques.

Antoine Prévost-Balga, Doctorant à la Goethe-Universität

11h30 Pause-café

12h00

Chromo-hygiène : images psychotechniques et moteur humain au début du XXe siècle

Alessandra Ronetti, ATER à l’Université Paris 1

12h30

Discussion

13h00 Pause déjeuner

14h30

Image opérative et productivité : l’esthétique fonctionnelle du travail

Guilherme Machado, Doctorant à l’Université Paris 3 et à la Goethe-Universität

15h00

Technique industrielle vue à travers l’objectif : de la photographie constructiviste à l’Enthousiasme (1930) de Dziga Vertov et K.SH.E (1932) d’Esther Choub

Natalia Milovzorova, Doctorante à l’Université Paris 3

15h30 Pause-café

15h45

L’art de la Mobile Color aux Etats-Unis: pour une archéologie techno-esthétique de la lumière projetée

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit, Doctorant à l’Université Paris 1

16h15

Projection: extraits de Lumia : The art of Light (1981) de Christian Sidenius (5min).

Projection Simon Starling, Black Drop, 2012 (27Min.)

17h00

Conclusion par Antonio Somaini, professeur en études cinématographiques, visuelles et théorie des médias à l’Université Paris 3.


17h30 Apéritif

5 novembre 2019 – 9H-18H

Salle Claude Simon,

Maison de la recherche – Sorbonne- Nouvelle, 4 rue des Irlandais, 75005 Paris

Entrée libre

Workshop “TÉlÉplaste” avec Tony oursler

L’Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art,

Fleur Hopkins (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/BnF),

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),

Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

ont le plaisir de vous convier le 22 janvier 2019 de 14H à 19H à un workshop en présence de l’artiste Tony Oursler   

 Lors de cet événement qui marque le point d’orgue du projet INHAlab2018 « Médias imaginaires », l’artiste américain Tony Oursler, figure essentielle de l’art vidéo qui réfléchit depuis plusieurs années maintenant aux médias invasifs, anticipatifs et prophétiques (The Influence Machine, 2016), s’intéressera à un curieux brevet d’Antoine Cros, du nom de « Téléplaste », c’est-à-dire un transmetteur de matière ou plus simplement une machine à téléporter. L’artiste proposera un atelier participatif où sera décrypté, étudié et imaginé le brevet de Cros, montrant les liens nombreux qui existent entre archéologie des médias et création contemporaine.  

Intervenants

Tony Oursler, artiste 

Pascal Rousseau, professeur d’histoire de l’art contemporain, Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne 

22 janvier 2019 – 14H-19H

Salle Longhi

Institut national d’histoire de l’art6, rue des Petits-Champs ou 2, rue Vivienne75002 Paris  

Entrée libre

Les Médias invasifs

 

L’Institut national d’histoire de l’art,

Fleur Hopkins (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/BnF),
Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),
Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

 

ont le plaisir de vous convier à la troisième séance du séminaire

 

Médias imaginaires : Les Médias invasifs

jeudi 6 décembre 2018 de 17h à 19h

Couverture « Work and learn while you sleep », Science and invention

Cette séance finale, construite autour du paradigme des technologies d’emprise, se recentre sur la peur (et la paranoïa) récurrente du contrôle et de l’invasion par la technique, comme l’étudie actuellement le théoricien des médias Jeffrey Sconce dans son projet à venir sur la technical delusion ou encore le théoricien de la littérature Yves Citton dans son analyse récente de la « médiarchie ».

 

Intervenants

    • Yves Citton (université Paris 8)
  • Jeffrey Sconce (université Northwestern)


Yves Citton 

Titre : Invaders from the Inside

Abstract: 

Where is one to locate “power” when speaking of media (or of “mediarchy”)? Inside, rather than above, as it is the case in our imaginary of political power (the King, the President, the boss), or rather than below, as it is the case in the Marxist economic theory of the infra-structures. The power of the media is not so much ubiquitous as it is intra-structural. Invasive media invade us from the inside! What can that mean? That is what this talk will attempt to figure out, first in presenting a few general theses, then in opening the discussion on their validity.

 

Jeffrey Sconce

Titre : The System

Abstract : 

Electronics can be thought of as the politics of electricity, a social dynamic of particular concern to those deemed  « mad, » « insane, » and « psychotic » over the past two centuries.  This talk examines the historical power(s) imagined to be behind the biopolitical drive toward invasive electronics, a paranoid project that often concretizes the metaphorical association of the body and the « body politic. »  From the 19th-century asylum to the « Truman Show Delusion, » the « mad » have demonstrated a frequently cogent suspicion, not only of media technologies, but also of the larger « systems » believed to develop and enforce a politics of the electronic.  

 

Galerie Colbert, salle Giorgio Vasari

Institut national d’histoire de l’art

6, rue des Petits-Champs ou 2, rue Vivienne

75002 Paris

Entrée libre

Plaquette_JE_22_NOV_3

Journée d’étude

Jeudi 22 novembre 2018, INHA, salle Vasari

« HYPNOSCOPIE »
Hypnose, arts et dispositifs optiques dans la culture visuelle du passage du siècle (1880 –1914).

Cette journée s’inscrit dans la continuité du programme de recherche « COSA MENTALE. Arts et cultures psychiques (XIXe – XXIe siècles)». Elle se donne pour objectif de réunir des universitaires dont les approches méthodologiques croisent archéologie des médias et culture visuelle sur cette période. Il s’agira d’analyser les liens entre théories, instrumentations et pratiques de l’hypnose médicale à la fin du XIXe siècle et le développement de nouvelles propositions et dispositifs visuels, notamment à travers la culture du spectaculaire des nouveaux médias (projections chromo- lumineuses, cinématographie) dans les relations étroites que ces derniers entretiennent, historiquement, avec des modèles épistémologiques offerts par la psychologie expérimentale.

09h30 Ouverture de la journée
Pascal Rousseau, université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

10h15 Arnaud Maillet, université Paris-Sorbonne.

Une goutte d’encre dans le creux de la main: hypnose et palamomancie

11h00 Pause café

HYPNOSE APPAREILLÉE ET SPECTACLES DE SUGGESTION

11h15 Mireille Berton, université de Lausanne, Suisse.

Du spectacle de magnétisme au cinématographe: hypnose appareillée et fabriques de corps automatiques

12h00 Alessandra Ronetti, Scuola Normale Superiore de Pise / université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.

Chromo-hypnose. Les pratiques de suggestion
dans Le peintre néo-impressionniste (1910) d’Émile Cohl

12h45 Pause déjeuner

MACHINES HYPNOTIQUES ET THÉORIE DE LA FOULE

14h30 Emmanuel Plasseraud, université Lille 3.

L’hypnose et la foule cinématographique dans la théorie du cinéma à l’époque muette

15h15 Fleur Hopkins, université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne / BnF.

Ondogène et autres machines à hypnotiser les foules
dans l’imaginaire merveilleux-scientifique

16h00 Discussion

16h30 Apéritif

Séminaire “Médias imaginaires” (oct. 2018-déc. 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

Les Médias invasifs

 

L’Institut national d’histoire de l’art,

Fleur Hopkins (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/BnF),
Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),
Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

 

ont le plaisir de vous convier à la troisième séance du séminaire

 

Médias imaginaires : Les Médias invasifs

jeudi 6 décembre 2018 de 17h à 19h

 

Couverture “Work and learn while you sleep”, Science and invention

Cette séance finale, construite autour du paradigme des technologies d’emprise, se recentre sur la peur (et la paranoïa) récurrente du contrôle et de l’invasion par la technique, comme l’étudie actuellement le théoricien des médias Jeffrey Sconce dans son projet à venir sur la technical delusion ou encore le théoricien de la littérature Yves Citton dans son analyse récente de la « médiarchie ».

 

Intervenants

  • Yves Citton (université Paris 8)
  • Jeffrey Sconce (université Northwestern)


Yves Citton 

Titre : Invaders from the Inside

Abstract: 

Where is one to locate “power” when speaking of media (or of “mediarchy”)? Inside, rather than above, as it is the case in our imaginary of political power (the King, the President, the boss), or rather than below, as it is the case in the Marxist economic theory of the infra-structures. The power of the media is not so much ubiquitous as it is intra-structural. Invasive media invade us from the inside! What can that mean? That is what this talk will attempt to figure out, first in presenting a few general theses, then in opening the discussion on their validity.

 

Jeffrey Sconce

Titre : The System

Abstract : 

Electronics can be thought of as the politics of electricity, a social dynamic of particular concern to those deemed  “mad,” “insane,” and “psychotic” over the past two centuries.  This talk examines the historical power(s) imagined to be behind the biopolitical drive toward invasive electronics, a paranoid project that often concretizes the metaphorical association of the body and the “body politic.”  From the 19th-century asylum to the “Truman Show Delusion,” the “mad” have demonstrated a frequently cogent suspicion, not only of media technologies, but also of the larger “systems” believed to develop and enforce a politics of the electronic.  

 

Galerie Colbert, salle Giorgio Vasari
Institut national d’histoire de l’art
6, rue des Petits-Champs ou 2, rue Vivienne
75002 Paris

Entrée libre

Les médias prophétiques

 

L’Institut national d’histoire de l’art,

 

Fleur Hopkins (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/BnF),
Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),
Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

 

ont le plaisir de vous convier à la deuxième séance du séminaire

 

Médias imaginaires : Les Médias prophétiques

vendredi 19 octobre 2018 de 15h à 19h

 

 

Le “Spiritoscope”, Robert Hare, “Experimental Investigation of the Spirit Manifestations, Demonstrating the Existence of Spirits and Their Communion with Mortals”, New York, Partridge and Brittan, 1856.

 

Cette séance accorde une place de choix à un aspect fondateur des études sur les médias imaginaires : les capacités « médiumniques » et supranaturelles des médias imaginaires, entre « occulture » et spectacularisation de la société.

 

Intervenants : 

Simone Natale, (Université de Loughborough), « Amazon can read your mind: A media archaeology into the imaginary of digital media ».

In parapsychology, the ability to gain information about others’ thoughts through extrasensory perception is called mind reading. Since this term was introduced in the second half of the nineteenth century, however, it has been employed in very different contexts, too. In the field of computer science, technologies programmed to understand and react to people’s emotions and mental states have been described as “mind reading computers.” Likewise, algorithms that allow one to anticipate the behavior of users and consumers and provide them with tailored offers and services –such as Google ads or Amazon’s “anticipatory shipping”- have also been assimilated within the mind reading hermeneutic. How can we explain this complex intertwining between technology and the occult? The talk addresses this question by locating the association between digital media technologies and the imaginary of mind reading within the development of cybernetics and Artificial Intelligence in the 1940s-50s, when researchers such as Claude Shannon started to present computer programs as “mind reading machines.” Addressing the idea of mind reading computers provides a viewpoint into the ways notions and narratives related to the supernatural enter the cultural imaginary of digital media and technologies.

Simone Natale is a Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University, UK. He is the author of Supernatural Entertainments: Victorian Spiritualism and the Rise of Modern Media Culture (Penn State University Press, 2016, paperback 2017) and the editor, with Nicoletta Leonardi, of Photography and Other Media in the Nineteenth Century, also published by Penn State University Press (2018). He is presently working on a monograph about the cultural history of the Turing Test.

Philippe Baudouin,  (France Culture), « Gaston Bachelard au pays des voix. Science, radio et télépathie ».

Lorsque Gaston Bachelard, philosophe et poète, donne en 1949 une causerie sur la rêverie et la radio, il livre à ses auditeurs un véritable manifeste. A la fois conférence étonnante et expérimentation sonore, l’intervention de Bachelard propose avec malice et ironie de développer un imaginaire des ondes, à mi-chemin entre le monde de la technique et celui de la télépathie. “Radiodiffuser les principes de la rêverie”, expérimenter le “rêve éveillé” : tels sont quelques-uns des mots d’ordre du philosophe pour qu’advienne enfin une utopie des ondes.

Philippe Baudouin est philosophe, réalisateur à France Culture et membre du Groupe de recherche sur la culture de Weimar (Maison des Sciences de l’Homme-Paris Nord). Il est l’auteur d’Au microphone: Dr. Walter Benjamin (MSH,2009) et a dirigé la publication du recueil Écrits radiophoniques de Walter Benjamin (Allia, 2014). Par ailleurs, ses recherches sur l’histoire de l’occultisme l’ont amené à publier Les Forces de l’ordre invisible. Émile Tizané (1901-1982), un gendarme sur les territoires de la hantise (Le Murmure, 2016). Il prépare actuellement une anthologie sonore des phénomènes occultes, à paraître sur le label Sub Rosa.

 

Institut national d’histoire de l’art Galerie Colbert, salle Giorgio Vasari

 

2 rue Vivienne ou 6 rue des Petits-Champs, 75002 Paris

 

Métro : Bourse ou Palais-Royal

 

 

Les médias anticipatifs

 

L’Institut national d’histoire de l’art,

Fleur Hopkins (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/BnF),
Pierre-Jacques Pernuit (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne),
Alessandra Ronetti (université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne/École normale supérieure de Pise)

ont le plaisir de vous convier à la première séance du séminaire

Médias imaginaires : Les Médias anticipatifs

lundi 1er octobre 2018 de 15h à 18h

L’histoire de l’art s’ouvre depuis quelques années maintenant à la discipline méconnue de l’archéologie des médias. Fort de ce constat, le projet Médias imaginaires entend réfléchir au concept central de « médias imaginaires » c’est-à-dire des appareils et instruments qui n’ont jamais vu le jour car irréalisables, sont restés au stade de brouillons, de concepts ou qui n’existent que dans l’imaginaire d’écrivains et d’artistes. Cette vie rêvée des appareils peut prendre trois formes: des médias anticipatifs tournés vers le futur imaginaire ou possible des artefacts que nous connaissons aujourd’hui ; des médias invasifs et autres appareils d’emprise qui prennent le contrôle de l’utilisateur; des médias prophétiques, capables de communiquer avec les mondes invisibles.

Albert Robida, Un commutateur transportait instantanément au fond de l’Asie, faisant apparaître…, illustration de Camille Flammarion, La fin du monde, Paris, E. Flammarion, 1894

Ce projet, porté par l’association IMAGO, comprend l’organisation de plusieurs activités scientifiques et de manifestations publiques au cours des quatre mois de résidence, notamment un séminaire de recherche international en trois séances, une exposition dans la salle dédiée au projet (salle Roberto Longhi, galerie Colbert) et un atelier avec Tony Oursler (sous réserve). 

Cette séance introductive porte sur la possibilité d’étudier des médias parfaitement imaginaires, tel que l’a préconisé Kluitenberg, figure essentielle de l’Archéologie des médias et à l’origine de l’ouvrage fondateur The Book of Imaginary Media. Excavating the Dream of the Ultimate Communication Medium en 2006.

Intervenant : Eric Kluitenberg (Dutch Art Institute, Pays-Bas), « On the Art of Imaginary Media »

Institut national d’histoire de l’art Galerie Colbert, salle Giorgio Vasari

2 rue Vivienne ou 6 rue des Petits-Champs, 75002 Paris

Métro : Bourse ou Palais-Royal

 

S5 Conclusion du séminaire “Cultures visuelles”

L’association IMAGO a le plaisir de vous inviter à la séance de conclusion de son séminaire « Cultures visuelles », qui se déroulera le mercredi 18 avril 2018, à 18h, en salle VASARI (INHA – Galerie Colbert – 2, rue Vivienne – 1e étage).

Cette séance vise à réfléchir aux rapports entre l’Histoire des arts et les Études visuelles, en mettant tout particulièrement l’accent sur leurs apports réciproques et plus spécifiquement sur la contribution de la première aux Études visuelles.
Ensuite, nous aborderons la question du positionnement des Media studies et de l’Archéologie des médias par rapport aux Etudes visuelles et nous interrogerons la notion de “cultures visuelles”. 

Les organisateur-e-s recevront à cette occasion Antonio Somaini, co-auteur de l’ouvrage Cultura visuale. Immagini, sguardi, media, dispositivi (Torino, Einaudi, 2016) et espèrent vous y accueillir nombreuses et nombreux.

Antonio Somaini,  professeur en études cinématographiques, études visuelles, théorie des médias à l’Université Paris 3, présentera une conférence intitulée : « L’historicité de la vision : culture visuelle, histoire de l’art, théorie des médias ».

Dès ses premières occurrences dans les écrits de Béla Balázs et de László Moholy-Nagy, le concept de « culture visuelle » est étroitement lié à l’idée que vision et visible sont historiquement déterminés, et que leur historicité est liée à celle des appareils et des dispositifs qui encadrent l’acte de voir et tracent le partage entre visible et invisible. Nous reviendrons sur cette question qui est encore au cœur des études sur la culture visuelle, en croisant des références provenant de l’histoire de l’art (Riegl, Wölfflin, Panofsky, Baxandall, Alpers) ainsi que de l’histoire des théories de la photographie, du cinéma et des médias (Balász, Benjamin, Epstein, Kracauer, Moholy-Nagy, Vertov).

L’équipe organisatrice :

Alessandra Ronetti

Fleur Hopkins

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit

S4 « MÉDIAS » DU SÉMINAIRE « CULTURES VISUELLES »

11 avril 2018, 4ème atelier méthodologique, salle GRODECKI, 18h00-20h00  : « MÉDIAS »

L’association IMAGO a le plaisir de vous inviter à la quatrième séance de son séminaire de recherche qui présentera cette fois la notion de « MÉDIAS ». Elle illustrera les développements principaux de la théorie et de l’archéologie des médias en tant qu’approches méthodologiques pour la recherche en histoire de l’art.

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit, doctorant à l’Université Paris 1 introduira la séance avec une analyse de la notion de « MÉDIAS».

Les organisateur-e-s recevront à cette occasion Riccardo Venturi, pour une réflexion autour de « La géologie comme modèle esthétique à l’époque de l’Anthropocène ».

Riccardo Venturi est historien de l’art et critique. Il a notamment collaboré avec les institutions suivantes : le Pavillon Italien de la 55ème Biennale de Venise (2013), le Maxxi, le Museo nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo (Rome), l’Accademia Nazionale di San Luca (Rome), le Center for Italian Modern Art (New York), le Film Forum Festival de Gorizia, le Victoria and Albert Museum (London). Riccardo Venturi a été Postdoctoral Fellow à la Phillips Collection Center for the Study of Modern Art, puis à la George Washington University de Washington entre 2012 et 2016. Ancien pensionnaire à l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA) à Paris, Riccardo Venturi écrit régulièrement sur la culture visuelle (« Cristalli liquidi ») dans « Alias », le supplément italien du magazine « Il manifesto » et collabore fréquemment au magazine Newyorkais Artforum. Il a notamment écrit Mark Rothko. Space and its discipline (Electa, Milan 2007), première monographie en italien sur l’artiste, Black paintings. Eclipse on Modernism (Electa, Milan 2008), une étude du monochrome dans la peinture d’Ad Reinhardt et Frank Stella, et Passione dell’indifferenza. Francesco Lo Savio (Humboldt Books).

independent.academia.edu/rventuri

L’équipe organisatrice :

Alessandra Ronetti

Fleur Hopkins

Pierre-Jacques Pernuit

Cultures Visuelles

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search